Oct/Nov 2016

Features

Gluten-Free Hair Care

Many people assume their personal care products are free from allergens. But ingredients like wheat, gluten, nut oil and other problematic items can find their way into body lotions, hand creams and hair products. Although celiac researchers assure us that gluten is not an issue when applied topically—the gluten molecule is too large to be absorbed through the skin—some gluten-sensitive people react when there’s skin contact.   More...

8 Tips for Trick-or-Treating with Food Allergies

If the thought of your little ghost or goblin trick-or-treating sends shivers up your spine, you’re not alone. Many parents of kids with food allergies and celiac disease feel this way. But Halloween doesn’t have to be so scary! There are many ways your child can safely participate in all the ghoulish fun. Here’s how to make trick-or-treat fun and safe for everyone.   More...

4 Healthy Plant Based Soup Recipes

Subscribers Only — When you eat healthy, wholesome foods, you provide your entire body, from your hair down to your toes, with the nutrients it needs to thrive. Try these colorful, nutritious plant-based gluten-free soups for healthy comfort and delicious inspiration.   More...

Gluten-Free Mashed Potato Recipes

Standard mashed potatoes require little more than boiling the spuds, dumping in butter and going to town with a masher. With a few simple tweaks in technique and ingredients, these easy gluten-free, dairy-free recipes reinvent your mashes, taking this iconic side from meh to memorable.   More...

Easy Gluten-Free Pumpkin Recipes

Subscribers Only — Don’t limit pumpkin to Halloween jack-o-lanterns and Gluten-Free Thanksgiving pies. This gorgeous gourd is worthy of much more attention. Loaded with vitamins and nutrients and low in fat and calories, pumpkin is both healthy and delicious. This year, expand your thinking and take advantage of pumpkin’s rich offerings. Try these scrumptious ways to include America’s favorite fall fruit in your menu planning.   More...

Gluten-Free Thanksgiving Turkey & Gravy

Subscribers Only — When it comes to the traditional holiday meal, roast turkey and gravy are front and center. If you’re dreading the preparation, relax! Any one of these gluten-free recipes will help you deliver the perfect bird.   More...

Lactose Intolerance

Subscribers Only — If dairy doesn’t seem to agree with you, you’re not alone. It’s estimated over half the world’s population has trouble digesting lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Reduced production of lactase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose, is to blame for the abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea and nausea.   More...

What You Should Know About GMOs

Genetically modified organism (GMO) is a term used to describe plants or animals altered via genetic engineering to achieve a certain beneficial trait. Examples include fish genes injected into strawberries to protect the fruit from freezing and dairy cows injected with the genetically engineered hormone rBGH (also known as rBST) to increase milk production. Virtually all plant GMOs are genetically engineered to withstand direct application of herbicides like glyphosate, the main ingredient in Roundup.   More...

No-Knead Gluten-Free Bread Recipes

No-knead bread became the rage a couple of years ago for people who bake with wheat flour. Its popularity was based on easy prep: Mix it up in a bowl, let it rest on the counter up to 18 hours and stick it in the oven. Voila! Homemade bread.   More...

Life Story

We’ve Got "Allergy Problems"

I have no problem educating one friend or server at a time about celiac disease but what do I do with 50 or more people at a potluck? I can bring a gluten-free main dish or dessert, but how can I be sure that I’ll get any of it? Or if there’s some left when I get there in line, how do I know that it hasn’t been contaminated by folks borrowing spoons? I can rush to the front of the line but that feels rude. I can serve myself before sharing my dish with others but that looks rude. Last time, I cooked and brought along a little separate casserole for myself. That worked fairly well—but no one is learning anything.   More...

You Said It: How Do You Conquer Your Gluten-Free Clutter?

Instead of buying multiple flours, I buy one all-purpose flour blend that I use one-for-one in all my favorite recipes. I also keep gluten-free pancake mix and cornbread mix on hand. We don’t have any “regular” flour or baking mixes in the house, which also helps reduce the clutter. Our freezer has two pull-out drawers where I stock my gluten-free bread, English muffins, etc. The only time it gets cluttered is when I go crazy buying locally produced gluten-free baguettes!   More...

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How-To: 6 Bone Strengthening Exercises

Subscribers Only — Low bone density is one of the most common complications of undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease. In women diagnosed with celiac disease as adults, it can hit especially hard. After age 40, women lose about 1 percent of their bone mass each year. These simple do-at-home exercises help boost bone.   More...

Try These New Gluten-Free Products: Fall 2016

Check out these fabulous new store-bought gluten-free food items, including awesome breakfast options like Stabilyze Nutrition Bars, organic vegan protein powder, Modern Oats instant oatmeal and Dr. Praeger's hash browns. Laiki rice crackers, ethically sourced quinoa, new Amy's meals, macadamia nut milk from Royal Hawaiian Orchards and, wait for it...gluten-free Hot Pocket replicas called Yummy Pockets are all covered here.   More...

The Best Gluten-Free Cornbread Mixes You Can Buy

We polled readers for their holiday menu must-haves and cornbread scored high on the list. It’s not just served as dinner bread; it can also be used in the turkey stuffing. Gluten shows up in most cornbread mixes—but no need to panic. Delicious gluten-free mixes are available…and they’re so easy! After much testing and tasting, here’s our list of top cornbread mixes, just in time for the holidays.   More...

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Allergy Research Roundup: Celiac by Ethnicity, Pneumonia Vaccine, and More!

In the United States, people with the highest rate of celiac disease are those hailing from the Punjab region of India, new research reveals. It’s long been thought that Americans of Caucasian European heritage have the highest rates of celiac disease. This study not only debunked this, it also showed that celiac disease distribution is similar among men and women, regardless of their ethnicity. Other findings revealed lower celiac rates in those of South Indian, East Asian and Hispanic ancestry. The incidence of celiac in people of Jewish and Middle Eastern descent is similar to other Americans.   More...

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